Sign in to follow this  
35whelen

Some Critters From Down Under

19 posts in this topic

Bat....our Hog deer are feisty little scrappers and busted antlers and tines are quite common. They tend to fight with their heads down low and normally "lock" antlers with their tops so the tine on the inside of the upper part of the beam (the inner top tine) often takes quite a hammering and gets broken off. So they certainly get grumpy and fights are common especially around now when the rut is on. Another likely reason for that antler shape is to assist with pushing thru the heavy scrub that the Hog and Sambar deer live in. These deer tend to walk or run with their noses high and their antlers laid back along their necks and shoulders and this forms a V type shape with all the tines facing backwards giving them less opportunity to get their antlers hooked up in scrub.

 

On scoring....in AU we use a system called the Douglas System for scoring antlers. It was devised in New Zealand and covers all our South Pacific deer species. It is based on symetry where the shorter of the two corresponding features are doubled to get the score. ie If antler length is 16" and 15 1/2" then the score for length is 31 (double 15 1/2)...we don't add the corresponding beam or time measurements togehter like some systems do. With that Hog deer stag his score would be the combined measurements of the shorter of : the antler beams, the brow tines, the outer tops, the inner tops, the minimum beam circumference above the brow and below the tops, the cirumference around the coronet (the burr at the base of each antler) then the maximum spread of the antlers and the span which is the inside measurement below the top tine junction....neither of these are doubled. There is also a penalty for over-spread antlers (antlers wider than the longest antler length) which is 3X the amount of overspread and this is deducted from the spread score before it is entered on the scoresheet....symetry again !

 

I am the state scorer for my home state of Victoria and am qualified to measure and certify trophies for our national trophy registers so I know the Douglas System very well. It has it's critics especially in relation to the "overspread penalty" aspect as a lot of our deer...especially the big sambar trophies....have overspread antlers and they cop the penalty which reduces the score but not the visual impact of the trophy of course. Most measuring systems have their critics for various reasons....pretty hard to get one that keeps 100% of hunters happy all of the time....the Douglas System is no different I guess.

 

Sorry for the off-topic "lesson" again....just the old school teacher lurking inside. :D Cheers

 

35Whelen

Edited by 35whelen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Do you get non-typical hog deer down there? Im sure you know what I mean but non typical like points going everywhere like this.

94.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

PH....occasionally we'll get a few extra points on our deer heads but nothing like some of your non-typical whitetail or mule deer. I've seen a few 8, 9 & 10 point hog deer (normally a 3X3) and occasionally a sambar with an extra small tine or two. Under the Douglas scoring system extra tines can add to the total score but they need to be counterparted...ie there needs to be another one on the other beam growing out of the same portion of the beam (or off a tine) in the same direction...so just a mess of extra tines here & there which are not counterparted don't score...but they sure look interesting.

 

In the pic of my 15 point Red deer...the two small circled extra tines (basal snags) are counterparted so they added to the score while the big extra tine on the RH beam (4th one up the beam) did not as there was not one in the same place on the other beam. Cheers from AU

 

35Whelen

 

post-5829-1296331513_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Thanks for sharing the cool pics and interesting facts !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this