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dgrad

A New Set

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I have thousands of trailcam pics of this buck over the years, but until last year all of my pics were at night. This buck dropped his antlers on December 14 in 2012, and on December 13 in 2013. While shedhunting in late March 2013, I saw the buck down in a deep brushy draw, and he already had very substantial antler growth. This gave me the idea to take a camera down in there last fall, and for the first time, I was able to get daylight pics and videos of the buck. These first two pics were taken by one of my w230 pocket cameras and the pics have been cropped. I will find some of my h55 videos from that set tonight and post one of them.

 

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Edited by dgrad

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Another W230 pic

 

 

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In 2002, bears turned over my deer feeder and destroyed the battery and electronics, and I have not used the feeder since. But a few weeks ago, I ordered parts and repaired the feeder. This feeder is a Spin-Cast feeder manufactured in San Antonio Texas. The feeder is mounted underneath a 30 gallon platic drum, and it sits atop three 10 foot steel pipes. The closest I can drive to this set is about 500 yards. It took five trips for me to pack the feeder, ladder, and feed to the set, and it has been set-up for almost two weeks now. I have only had a W230 pocket cam there for a week now, and so far no droptines. but he will eventually find the feeder. I had one problem with this feeder. It was designed to feed corn, and that was what I used in the past. There was a plastic funnel at the top of the feeder that had a one inch hole. We feed the deer and elk with garbanzo beans here now because they are more than 50 percent cheaper, and the deer and elk will trample corn to get to the beans. But the beans would not feed through the one inch hole, so I drilled a two inch hole in the funnel. Then another problem I had was there is a very small area for the beans to land on bare ground because the feeder slings it out s far. Most of the beans would be lost in tall grass and brush. To fix this problem, I cut a piece of outdoor carpet 12 inches wide and long enough to go around the feeder drum. Then I cut the bottom 8 inches of the carpet in small strips about 3/4" wide. Then I used the screws that are used to install metal roofing to attach the carpet to the drum. This worked extremely well. When the feeder is feeding, all the little fingers pf carpet flutter, but the beans fall straight down under the feeder. This also keeps the beans in front of the camera. This set is just beginning and it will produce lots of great pictures hopefully starting very soon. Droptines is now four months into his new antler growth, and he looses his velvet in early July. I am hoping to be able to watch his antler growth on this set

 

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Edited by dgrad

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Awesome buck gotta love drop tines. Garbanzos? Don't think we gots them here, but I like the feeder idea; looking forward to Mr. DT when he finds them.

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I was not able to post videos last year, and I have better ones than this one but they are still on my old computer. The camera was an H55/yeti

 

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I can see Photobucket is not the place to put your videos The camera is mounted on a very large Douglas Fir tree. The tree is not round but irregular in shape. This makes it impossible to get the camera aimed properly. this picture was one of the first right after I set the camera. I have the aim problem corrected now

 

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Last fall I had to make a bracket out of plywood and mount it on the tree using deck screws, and I had to do this again. The camera took this pic of me as I approached the tree to install the bracket and correct my aim problem. I have the bracket on my hand, and my cordless drill is in my backpack. The plywood bracket also has a plastic coffee can that shields the camera from rain and weather. This set is ready for action now. After droptines finds the set again, I will take two Sony hx20v builds to the set. One will be set for video and the other for pictures. In this pic,you can see the carpet strips hanging down from the feeder drum. this turned out to be a great idea because it concentrates the beans directly under the feeder, and that pile of beans is eight feet from the camera.

 

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